Sunday, January 20, 2008

More in with new, out with old

Inspired by the ski boot upgrade, I thought, why stop there? The dish towels need improving as well. So . . .


OUT! Actually, into the rag bag.

and . . .


IN! Aren't these cute? On sale at my local fancy grocery.

Then, since I was on the topic of textiles but in spite of the fact that nearly all of my house is a post-holiday wreck and laundry is piling up to alarming levels, I decided what needed reorganizing was my dinning room buffet. Honestly, I'm the only one who opens it and it's probably the least consequential area of the house for anyone else. Maybe I just wanted a small organizational project that I could actually complete. And my mother-in-law will be coming for Sunday dinner, so I will be opening it tonight . . .



Anyhoo, I think it looks good, and something in this house has got to be about me.

4 comments:

suburban mom said...

Cindi - that sounds just like our auction. All the schools do it around here. I'm in charge of corporate donations - and I think I am just about done. ack! I can't believe how many letters I sent out, emails I sent, businesses I visited....

Impoverished Preppy said...

Don't you love organization projects that can be completed in a single evening? Such a nice sense of accomplishment without a lot of bother.

Was reading through your posts (taking a break from de-plaster dusting the first floor) and noticed you mentioned Rhodesian Ridgebacks... have you read The Dogs of Babel?

Cindy said...

IP: I've never heard of it but just looked it up on Amazon.com. Have you read it? Amazon gives a mixed review but does compare it to another noteworthy book on grieving, Lovely Bones, which I really enjoyed in spite of the subject matter.

At any rate, the cover photograph is beautiful.

Impoverished Preppy said...

It's worth reading. The plot gets a bit ridiculous at points as far as the talking dog scenario goes (narrator becomes involved with some truly odd and sinister folks who want to make dogs speak) but the story of the narrator's relationship with his dead wife makes it worth the time.